marchioness > blog
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Her Body and Other Parties (2017)

Urban Life
Author Carmen Maria Machado melds together genres into an alluring and disturbing package of short stories in Her Body and Other Parties (2017), blurring the lines between psychological horror and science fiction with a strong feminist sensibility. The bodies of these fictional women are subjected to unsettling and grotesque horrors that directly mirror the real-world violence that women are faced with.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

The Nest (2020)

Urban Life
Picture this: your perfect eighties nuclear family moves from New York City to a bleak estate in the English countryside. No, not the country, Surrey; the natural setting for a horror film. You are unable to decorate or fill the vacant rooms, so you close the doors and neglect them. The hedges are trimmed like dungeon walls. You start waking up alone after years of being greeted by your husband with a cup of coffee and a kiss. Perhaps you are going mad.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Melancholia (2011)

Urban Life
Lars von Trier’s portrayal of depression, starring Kirsten Dunst and Charlotte Gainsbourg, has gained infamy for good reason. After more than ten years, Von Trier’s depiction of mental health remains unique by neither romanticising nor stigmatising it. Von Trier simply portrays it as it is: insanely confusing but altogether human.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Fat Girl (2001)

Urban Life
Fat Girl (2001) sticks with you after the credits roll because it attaches itself to a known fear. French auteur, Catherine Breillat, artfully deconstructs the psychological and somatic fears inherent to the female lived experience; all of the moral and emotional offences which occur in this horror-of-a-film are so commonplace that we seem to accept and/or remember experiencing them.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Fresh (2022)

Urban Life
“I hate like dating, you know? Everything about it,” says Fresh’s heroine Noa, played by Daisy Edgar-Jones. As a single girl currently living in London, I can completely relate. In the words of Carrie Bradshaw circa late 1990s, us single girls are living in the ‘city of un-innocence’; endless swipes, never-ending fuck boys, dates with zero chemistry and where happy endings seem like a myth. But such modern dating woes all seem idyllic compared to being entrapped by a cannibalistic killer.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

The Lost Daughter (2021)

Urban Life
Sunlight dapples on water, waves crash, and cicadas whirr. The air feels thick and heavy. Beneath the haze of summer, the film seethes quietly. Fruit sits rotting in a basket. A worm crawls from the mouth of a doll. Pristine in white, except for a spot of blood, Leda (Olivia Coleman) stands ghostly against a dark sea. So begins The Lost Daughter, brimming with foreboding. Leda’s name, even, is drenched in canonic sorrow; first in Greek mythology, later in the WB Yeats poem. The sense of threat is palpable.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Somersault (2004)

Urban Life
A somersault, by definition, is a body doing a complete 360° roll, and in Cate Shortland’s coming of age film the young protagonist Heidi (Abbie Cornish) life experiences a similar spiral. Somersault deals with self-exploration, trauma, and sexuality while also touching upon a raw young love that neither lover is prepared for.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Dear Babylon (2019)

Urban Life
Police, protests and housing estates. Real conversations about governmental action and the marginalisation of the working class. Director Ayo Akingbade throws us into constructed archival footage, while we learn of the passing of a fictional ‘AC30 Housing Bill,’ which would see them evicted for the same reasons they live in low-income housing. The impact of Dear Babylon has particular weight in London’s East End; here, we meet a plethora of people living in Tower Hamlets. We discover the real lives this classist bill affects. The message is clear: people living in housing estates matter, the working class matter, the people of London matter.
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Yves Saint Laurent: The Last Collections (2019)

Urban Life
The urge that many of us have to see behind the proverbial curtain to peer into the inner world of the lives of the rich and famous, particularly those whose genius and esteem is shrouded in relative mystery, has by now been well-documented. Social media has opened the door for us, the public, to be conscious observers. We’ve seen this with the advent of celebrities on social media, and now especially in the era of ‘casual instagram’, the perfectly curated slice of life depiction is now the new centre stage…
Screenshot-2021-05-30-11-9.jpeg

Adult World (2013)

Urban Life
Hidden gem Adult World is a coming-of-age story for the previously gifted, Rory Gilmore sympathisers amongst us: the kids or teens that excelled at school, fought their way into higher education, and grew up thinking they’d become famous only to realise getting discovered is hard, and life in your twenties is even harder.