Daisy Jones & The Six (2019)
Words by Nia Lampani
♦︎
✧​

Daisy Jones & The Six (2019)

♦︎
imperialistsarestillalive-940x460.jpeg
When I read Daisy Jones and the Six, for the first of three times, I was on a high-speed train crossing the Spanish countryside on my way to an interview that would change my life forever. The seat beside me was empty, and so the pages became my only companion. I put my AirPods on and started reading. It took me less than thirty pages to realise I had something extraordinary between my hands.
♦︎

I finished the book before arriving at my destination. I precisely remember sitting in my seat, throwing my head back, thinking that I love these women. Daisy Jones and the Six is all about sex, drugs, and rock ‘n’ roll, yet Daisy, Camila, and Karen were all I could think about. In a story about the rise and fall of the biggest rock band in the world, women were, as we usually are, the moving force; simultaneously triggering their downfall and keeping them from falling apart.


The golden girl; the beautiful and damned Daisy Jones. She’s simply a woman seen through the glass of the patriarchy. She isn’t valued, she isn’t respected or loved, but she’s desired. She’s constantly watched yet never seen. She’s the girl on the cover of the magazine, yet there's nothing but emptiness when the spotlight fades away. She’s what everyone else wants her to be so much that there is barely any space left for who she really is.


While Daisy is the It-girl, Camila is the ‘chosen one’. She’s everything Daisy’s not. She is valued, she is respected and she is loved, but she’s forgotten. Camila is the kind of woman men love to underestimate. She’s loving and kind, and that’s why they can’t see that she’s strong and resilient. For them, she will always be a housewife. As if women weren’t much more than that. As if it wasn’t more than enough to create a heaven of a family in the darkest of hells.


Then there’s Karen: the rock star, and the rebel with a cause. She doesn’t want to fit in the mould that was created for her. She learned at a very young age that there are certain expectations to being a woman, expectations that were so far away from who she was that she never wanted to meet them. Concurrently, she learned that there will always be a man pushing you to fulfil those expectations. Sometimes it is a man that you love. And when those times come, even if it breaks your heart, you have to bite back.


When it comes to Karen and Daisy, there’s a very interesting duality that’s subtly expressed through their fashion choices. They both know they live in a man's world. They know they are preyed on and stripped naked by the eyes of thousands of strangers every day. So Karen says fuck it, I’m not doing that, I won’t be that for them. She wears her turtlenecks and flips off anyone who suggests she goes on stage with a skirt. But Daisy… there’s a different power in what she does. She's a rara avis. She knows how the world works, but she just doesn’t give a single damn. She’s Daisy fucking Jones, she’s not going to cover up for anyone. She’s nobody’s muse and she’s nobody’s eye candy and still, she revindicates her right to be sexy. Take her as she is, judge her as you may. She’s unapologetically herself. “I am not going to sit around sweating my ass off just so men can feel more comfortable. It’s not my responsibility to not turn them on. It’s their responsibility to not be an asshole.”


This story is full of brilliant and powerful women, all different from each other, yet all united by the curse and blessing that is womanhood. We get to know all of them, the way they see the world, and most importantly, the way they see themselves versus the way the world sees them. Jenkins makes you love them and envy an aspect of each of them, but she doesn’t make you wish you were one of them. Because they are all fucked up in a way, they all suffer in a way, and they all are broken in a way. As Taylor Jenkins writes: “Women will crush you, you know? I suppose everybody hurts everybody, but women always seem to get back up, you ever notice that? Women are always still standing.”